Home > Copyright, P2P, Privacy, Teksavvy, User Rights, Voltage > Teksavvy vs Voltage Going to Appeals

Teksavvy vs Voltage Going to Appeals

Teksavvy has filed an appeal on costs in the latest legal battle over file sharing in Canada involving Voltage pictures.  Copyright Lawyer Howard Knopf has written an excellent blog regarding the privacy implications of what has taken place to date, and has a different take on the privacy implications of the previous court decision than Micheal Geist. Knopf worte:

I must respectfully and explicitly disagree, which I rarely do, with Prof. Michael Geist; however, I must do so about this case. He has been very supportive of TekSavvy throughout. He had a blog the other day entitled “Defending Privacy Doesn’t Pay”.  In my view, it would be more accurate to say that defending privacy can and does pay if done vigorously and out of principle – both in terms of legal costs and subscriber good will. Moreover, full indemnity legal costs are very rarely recovered in Canadian litigation. Responsible ISPs should expect to incur some non-recoverable legal costs for defending their customers’ privacy as part of their “cost of doing business”. Indeed, speaking generally and not necessarily about this case, it’s arguable that ISPs have a positive duty to actually oppose ill-founded motions for disclosure and that failing to do so could expose them to liability – but that’s another topic for another day.

Knopf’s blog is a must read for those who are following the case regardless of the position you have taken.  Knopf also points to an article in which lead legal council for Voltage is implying that Voltage may seek “actual” costs when going after downloaders which I find extremely interesting:

Zibarras explained that plaintiffs in piracy cases can opt for statutory damages or actual damages. The former are awarded automatically once it’s been proven in court the defendant actually did download the movie. The latter, actual damages, take into account how much money the production company may have lost due to the downloading and subsequent distribution.

In 2013 the US’s first file sharing case involving Jamie Thomas-Rasset made it’s way up the appeals process to the supreme court.  Thomas-Rasset was sued $222,000 for sharing 24 songs, in which her lawyer found that amount to be rather excessive and punitive, and wanted the case to be closer to the “actual” damages that occurred.  The Obama administration filed an interesting defense under which it defended the $222,000 ruling stating essentially that if actual damages were sought, than it would leave copyright holders unable to enforce their rights under law, and the US Supreme Court should not hear the case.  The Obama admin stated in the briefing:

“The public interest cannot be realized if the inherent difficulty of proving actual damages leaves the copyright holder without an effective remedy for infringement,”

The US Supreme Court decided not to hear the case and sided with the Obama admin.  This is why those following this case need to be properly informed.  Both Teksavvy and Voltage have their own interests, all of which seem to be trying to manipulate the public view to their advantage, which does nothing to properly inform those Teksavvy customers affected.  It’s an unfortunate situation, one I hope stops in the appeals process, or at least the courts can rise above all of this.

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